How Many Ages Hence

Shall these our lofty scenes be acted over.
In states unborn and accents yet unknown!

Master: Kizami Amenoya 雨ノ夜刻

Interested in:
Science Fiction; Star Trek (especially TNG), Star Wars, Legend of the Galactic Heroes (銀河英雄伝説, Japanese space opera)
Music; Sound Horizon & Revo (Japanese musician)
Animals; Bird of Preys, Bats, Reptiles, Insects

Speciality: Science Museum
Language: Japanese/English
Recent Tweets @
Posts I Like
Who I Follow

Hydrangea sp.

Sound Horizon Miis in my nintendo 3ds.
Upper left to right: Revo, Hiver, Shaytan;
Lower left to right: Marchen, Idolfried, Elefseus

Sound Horizon Miis in my nintendo 3ds.

Upper left to right: Revo, Hiver, Shaytan;

Lower left to right: Marchen, Idolfried, Elefseus

2nd anniversary of Hayabusa’s returning to Earth!

Photo: life-scale model of Hayabusa, taken in 2009 at JAXA Sagamihara campus

Beautiful!
Someday I’d like to meet them in wild :-)

fairy-wren:

little owls

(photo by dileep anthikad)

(birds-of-prey-dailyから)

What on earth is going on in our Sound Horizon Kingdom?

Anyway, live long and prosper to “His Magesty” Revo!

theatlantic:

In Focus: Shuttles Sail to Their New Homes

After NASA shut down the Space Shuttle Program, the remaining shuttles and replicas were divided among several cities, as museum displays. Over the past few weeks, two shuttles that never flew to space were transported by barge to their new homes. The Enterprise was sailed up the Hudson River to its new position aboard the U.S.S. Intrepid, part of the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum, and the shuttle replica named Explorer sailed from Florida to Houston, Texas, where it will be displayed at the Johnson Space Center.

See more. [Images: AP, Getty]

The Voyage (to new) Home!

(n-a-s-aから)

fairy-wren:

white-tailed sea eagle with unfortunate crane

(photo via digital georgia circuit)

He is not hunting the crane, is he?

(birds-of-prey-dailyから)

amnhnyc:

A rare astronomical event is upon us: today our sister planet Venus will transit our Sun. 

Venus transits occur in pairs, eight years apart, followed by a break of more than 100 years. The first Venus transit in the current pair took place in June 2004 and was visible at sunrise from NYC. After today, the next Venus transit won’t occur until December 2117, over 105 years from now.

Today at 5:30 pm, we’re hosting a live simulcast of this rare transit from the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii. Learn more about the transit and the simulcast here

Image taken by NASA scientist Fred Espenak of the 2004 event